The Trouble With Bashing Bond Indexes

In my last post, I looked at a tired criticism of traditional equity index funds. Similar arguments have been made against fixed-income index funds, most recently in a blog post called The Trouble With Bond Indices produced by Mawer Investment Management. And once again, they don’t hold up to scrutiny.

First the background. Bond indexes, like their equity counterparts, are usually weighted by market capitalization. This means governments and companies that issue the most bonds (by dollar value) receive the largest weight in the index. Most index investors in Canada use funds that include only domestic bonds, and typically these are roughly one-third federal government bonds, one-third provincial and municipal bonds, and one-third corporate bonds. Global bond index funds are much less common in Canada (only Vanguard offers an ETF in this asset class), but the principle is the same: countries that issue the most debt receive the greatest weight in the index.

You may have already spotted the potential red flag: the more debt a country or company has on its books, the more of its bonds you’re likely to own if you use an index fund.

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It’s Better With Beta

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