A New ETF Structure for Accumulators

ETF launches are generally unexciting these days: most new products focus on increasingly narrow niches or exotic strategies. But last week BMO unveiled an innovative ETF structure that may just have some lasting appeal. They launched a new share class of four existing short-term bond ETFs: called “Accumulating Units,” these new funds do not pay their distributions in cash like traditional ETFs. Instead, they reinvest all the interest payments immediately and increase the net asset value (and market price) accordingly.

An example will help. Consider a bond ETF with a unit price of $15 at the beginning of the year. Over the next 12 months it pays out 3% in interest and falls in price by 1%. The fund’s one-year total return would therefore be 2% (the 3% interest minus the 1% capital loss). If this ETF were available in both the traditional and Accumulating Units structure, both would report the same performance. But they would arrive there in different ways:

Traditional ETF
Accumulating Units

Unit price at beginning of year
$15.00
$15.00

Cash distributions (3%)
$0.45
$0

Reinvested distributions (3%)
$0
$0.45

Capital loss (1%)
-$0.15
-$0.15

Unit price at end of year
$14.85
$15.30

Value of ETF unit + cash
$15.30
$15.30

One-year total return
2%
2%

What they’re not

The idea of reinvested distributions is not new,

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