Archive | ETFs

Ask the Spud: My ETF Is Shutting Down

Q: I received a notice that an ETF I own will be closed within the next few months. Is it better to sell it now or wait until the termination date? – S.H.

ETFs are now available for just about every niche sector and exotic asset class, so it shouldn’t be surprising when some of these fail to attract investor dollars. If an ETF cannot attract enough assets to be sustainable within a couple of years, the provider may decide to shut down the fund.

ETF closures have been relatively uncommon in Canada, but this year has seen several death sentences. In June, BlackRock announced it will be shuttering six products, including the iShares Broad Commodity (CBR), the iShares China All-Cap (CHI), iShares Oil Sands (CLO) and the iShares S&P/TSX Venture (XVX). Earlier in the year Horizons also terminated its broad commodity ETF as well as couple of its leveraged ETFs.

What should you do if you learn that an ETF you own will soon be shut down? To help answer this question, I reached out to Mark Noble,

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Vanguard’s VXC Gets a Facelift

The Vanguard FTSE All-World ex Canada (VXC) allows Canadians to get access to US, international and emerging markets equities with a single ETF, and it’s one of the ingredients in my model portfolios. Vanguard recently announced some planned changes to VXC’s benchmark index, so let’s take a closer look.

Right now, VXC holds only large and mid-cap stocks, but it will soon be adding small-caps to the mix—at least for overseas markets. This will come about indirectly as a result of changes to the benchmark indexes of three of the fund’s underlying holdings.

VXC gets exposure to international developed and emerging markets through three US-listed ETFs: Vanguard FTSE Europe (VGK), Vanguard FTSE Pacific (VPL) and Vanguard FTSE Emerging Markets (VWO). These will soon begin tracking new “all cap” indexes that include small companies as well as large and mid-caps. Vanguard estimates that small-caps will eventually make up about 10% of each ETF. To reflect these changes, VXC will receive a new name: the Vanguard FTSE Global All Cap ex Canada Index ETF.

But it’s not clear whether VXC will add small-caps to its US equity exposure.

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Are Preferred Share Indexers Dumb Money?

It’s hard to keep a straight face while arguing for active strategies in asset classes like large-cap stocks or government bonds. Those markets are so liquid and so well covered by analysts that it’s almost impossible to find and exploit inefficiencies. But many would argue that active managers at least have a fighting chance in asset classes that like, say, emerging markets or small-cap stocks.

On the heels of my previous posts on Canadian preferred shares, let’s consider whether this is another asset class where active managers can be expected to add value compared with a simple indexed approach using ETFs. I recently explored this idea in a conversation with Nicolas Normandeau of Fiera Capital, who manages the Horizons Active Preferred Share ETF (HPR). I think it’s important to have these debates occasionally, because if you believe in indexing, it’s important to be able to defend the strategy with rational arguments and not ideology.

Here are the main arguments in favour of using an active strategy with preferred shares:

The market is complex and inefficient. The entire preferred share market in Canada is about $60 to $65 billion—about the same as the market cap of Canadian National Railway.

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When Discount Bonds Are Hard to Find

Everyone loves a discount, but if you’re buying bonds these days you may be out of luck.

Just over a year ago, the BMO Discount Bond (ZDB) was launched as a tax-efficient alternative to traditional bond ETFs. ZDB tracks the broad Canadian market, but it selects bonds trading at a discount, or at a very small premium. Discount bonds have a lower coupon than comparable new bonds, and they will mature with a small capital gain. That combination is more tax-efficient than premium bonds, which have higher coupons and mature at a loss.

A discount bond ETF is a great idea for non-registered accounts, but it faced challenges from the beginning. After many years of interest rates trending downward, there simply aren’t many discount bonds in the marketplace. Traditional broad-market bond ETFs hold between 500 and 900 issues, but ZDB holds just 55.

This constraint has become more urgent after the Bank of Canada unexpectedly cut short-term rates in January. Yields on intermediate and longer-term bonds also fell, driving bond prices up sharply. Suddenly bonds that were trading at a discount were priced at or above par.

In my blog post introducing ZDB,

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Which Bond ETF Is Most Tax-Efficient?

Back in September, my colleague Justin Bender and I published a white paper entitled After-Tax Returns: How to estimate the impact of taxes on ETF performance. Justin has now updated his Excel calculator and made it available for free download on his blog.

Recently Justin put his own methodology to work by measuring the 2014 after-tax returns of 10 short-term bond ETFs. As it happens, 2014 was a relatively good year for short-term bonds: as interest rates fell again, ETFs in this asset class delivered returns between 2.3% and 3.5%. But as we have written about before, traditional fixed income ETFs tend to be full of premium bonds, which are notoriously tax-inefficient because of their high coupons. If you held one of these ETFs in a non-registered account, your after-tax return would have been lower.

Launched in 2013, the First Asset 1-5 Year Laddered Government Strip Bond (BXF) was designed to be a tax-friendly alternative. Strip bonds do not make interest payments like traditional bonds do: rather, they are sold at a discount and mature at par value.

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iShares Expands Its Core ETF Lineup

iShares shook up the ETF marketplace last March when it launched its Core family of low-cost ETFs in the major asset classes. This week iShares announced some new additions to its Core lineup, including two broad-market funds that go head-to-head with recently launched ETFs from Vanguard. Let’s take a peek at these compelling new offerings.

Blanket coverage of the US

First up is the iShares Core S&P U.S. Total Market (XUU), which provides exposure to the broad US stock market, including large, mid and small cap stocks.

This is iShares’ answer to the Vanguard U.S. Total Market (VUN), and it comes in five basis points cheaper, with a management fee of just 0.10%. However, the coverage is not quite as complete: VUN holds more than 3,800 stocks, compared with 1,500 for XUU. Although XUU’s benchmark is the S&P Total Market Index (which includes almost 3,900 companies) the fund actually holds three US-listed ETFs that make up the S&P Composite 1500 Index. But we should keep this in perspective: the other 2,300 companies are so small that they collectively make up just 10% of the US market,

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Tracking Error on International Funds

I recently received an email from a reader, J.W., who wanted to know why the tracking error on some popular Vanguard international equity ETFs were so high in 2014. He noted, for example, that the Vanguard FTSE Developed ex North America (VDU) lagged its benchmark index by 1.62% last year, far more than one would expect.

An index fund’s tracking error is the difference between the performance of the fund itself and that of its benchmark. If the index returns 10% on the year and the fund delivers 9.8%, the tracking error is 0.20%, or 20 basis points. But what could possibly cause a fund to show a tracking error of 162 basis points?

Any time you see a surprising number like this, it’s important to determine the reason: otherwise you risk making a bad decision because you’re working with inaccurate or misleading information. If an index were to lag its benchmark by more than 1.6% because it was badly managed, then you should look for a better alternative. But Vanguard has a long record of tight tracking error, so something else has to be going on here—and indeed it is.

Back on track

To understand VDU’s large tracking error—and why it’s not as bad as it looks—let’s look at the reasons its performance deviated so far from the index.

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Taking ETF Trades to the Next Level

Experienced investors know the theory: ETFs are supposed to trade very close to their net asset value (NAV). And most of the time they do. But this week my PWL Capital colleague Justin Bender and I encountered a glaring exception that could have had expensive consequences.

On Monday, Justin and I wanted to sell the iShares US Dividend Growers Index ETF (CUD) in a client’s account. It was a large trade: more than 5,000 shares, which worked out to over $160,000. As we always do before making such a trade, we got a Level 2 quote, which reveals the entire order book. In other words, it tells you how many shares are being offered on the exchange for purchase or sale at various prices. By contrast, a Level 1 quote—the type normally available through discount brokerages—only tells you how many shares are available at the best bid and ask prices.

If an ETF’s market maker is doing its job, there should be thousands of shares available at the best price. But we were surprised to find the Level 2 quote looked like this:

Source: Thomson ONE

Let’s unpack this.

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The Limits of Limit Orders

For some time now I’ve been suggesting that ETF investors use limit orders—never market orders—when placing trades in their accounts. A market order will be filled (usually immediately and in full) at the best available price. A limit order allows you to specify the maximum price you’ll pay when buying, or the minimum you’ll accept when selling. But judging from some of the comments I’ve received recently, many investors are not clear on the reasons for this advice.

Some seem to believe that placing limit orders will allow them to get a “better price” than they would have obtained with a market order. But if the exchange functions the way it’s supposed to, that’s not true. Using limit orders is not like haggling with a salesman on a used car lot: you can’t get a good deal just because you drive a hard bargain.

Consider three ETF investors—Mark, Cheryl, and Barney—who want to buy 100 shares of the Vanguard Canadian Aggregate Bond (VAB). They get the following quote from their brokerage:

Because they’re placing a buy order, our three investors look at the ask price,

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